Grand World Voyage

World
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What's included

Outside from: $41385*
Inside from: $39030*
*Indicative pricing only.
Please view the important notice.

Itinerary

  • Day 1 - Fort Lauderdale There is an abundance of things to see and do in the Ft. Lauderdale area: visit the newly redesigned Ft. Lauderdale Beach and cafes, stroll the historic Riverwalk, shop the luxurious stores on Las Olas Boulevard or adventure to the Everglades for an intriguing air boat excursion.
  • Day 2 - At Sea
  • Day 3 - At Sea
  • Day 4 - At Sea
  • Day 5 - Scarborough Perched on the hillsides above the Southern Caribbean Sea, Scarborough was the site of numerous territorial disputes between England, France, and the Dutch Republic; the island gained independence in 1962. Explore Fort King George, an 18th century fortification and historic and archaeological museum; discover rare flora at the Botanical Gardens and Orchid House; and shop for local crafts and taste treats at the local market.
  • Day 6 - At Sea
  • Day 6 - At Sea
  • Day 7 - Devil's Island Devil's Island, part of a three-island chain called Îles du Salut, in French Guiana, was home to one of the most infamous—and impregnable—prisons of the 19th and 20th centuries. Opened in 1852, it received worldwide renown in the mid-1890s when French military captain Alfred Dreyfus was sentenced to life imprisonment after being wrongly convicted of selling military secrets to Germany. Although Dreyfus's sentence was commuted after five years, more than 80,000 political prisoners and hardened criminals endured years of mistreatment and abuse among disease-ridden conditions. Few were able to escape, though Henri Charrière, author of the book Papillon, allegedly succeeded by filling sacks with coconuts in order to float to the mainland. The prison was officially closed in 1953. In 1965, the French government transferred responsibility of the island to the Guiana Space Centre, and in recent years, tourism facilities have been added. Devil's Island and its two smaller neighboring islands receive more than 50,000 visitors each year.
  • Day 8 - Crossing the Amazon River Bar, Brazil
  • Day 8 - Amazon River Cruising
  • Day 9 - Macapa At the mouth of the mighty Amazon River, Macap is a city surrounded by encroaching jungle and the lush greenery of the Brazilian rainforest. The Amazon region is unique, in that it is home to an estimated one third of the planet's living species, including birds, sea and river turtles, giant alligators and more. The many rivers of the basin, through which one-fifth of the world's fresh water flows, lead to the heart of the jungle. The Amazon River itself is 4,000 miles long. Take a jungle cruise along the Amazon River to see the jungle in more detail - and from the safety of a boat. Nearby, art and pottery from native Indian tribes can be found in the popular Ver-o-Peso market.
  • Day 9 - Crossing the Equator
  • Day 9 - Amazon River Cruising
  • Day 10 - Alter Do Chao Not for nothing is Alter do Chão known as the Caribbean of the Amazon. Taken as a whole, the village's white powdery beaches, transparent blue-green waters and hang-loose vibe would make a perfectly convincing addition to the Lesser Antilles. Of course, there are tip-offs that you're still in the midst of South America's River Sea, not least the neighboring rain forest and the pink dolphins—those local mascots—that periodically surface in the water. This uncommon tropical charm lies at the heart of Alter do Chão's appeal—but the place becomes outright irresistible when you factor in the curiously cosmopolitan inhabitants (expat hippies, herbalists and nature lovers in addition to Brazilians) and the cute little shops, cafés and businesses they've created. You'd be hard-pressed to find a more relaxing or beautiful stop in which to enjoy a drink by the water (or even sometimes in the water, seated in a slightly submerged chair—a local tradition) before doing a little exploring by boat or on foot.
  • Day 11 - Boca da Valeria Surrounded by the Amazonian rain forest, Boca da Valeria, a small Brazilian settlement of fewer than 100 people, boasts no tourism infrastructure. Yet the destination lures travelers by offering an authentic glimpse of the simple river life that the Amerindians have followed for centuries. Meaning "Mouth of the Valeria River," the remote fishing and trading village sits at the convergence of the Amazon and the Rio da Valeria. The local children guide visitors along a dirt footpath and pose for pictures in their native costumes, often with exotic animals in tow. Boca da Valeria, which is located between the towns of Parintins and Santarém, stands in stark contrast to nearby urban centers such as Manaus, where residents live with all the comforts, and complications, of contemporary life—but therein lies the appeal to the world adventurer.
  • Day 12 - Manaus If ever a city were a model for boom and bust, it would be Manaus, which lies at the confluence of Brazil’s Amazon River and Rio Negro, more than 1,450 kilometers (900 miles) from the Atlantic Ocean. Like in America’s Old West, great fortunes were amassed in no time here and vanished just as quickly during the boom years of rubber production in the late 19th century. The most enduring memorial of that time is the great opera house and theater that are still in use today, and whose existence in the Amazon helped inspire the 1982 movie Fitzcarraldo, about one man’s maniacal obsession with bringing opera to the jungle. These days, Manaus is downright huge—perhaps surprisingly, it’s Brazil’s seventh-largest city. A swank new soccer stadium was added for the 2014 World Cup, and a three-kilometer-long (two-mile-long), cable-stayed bridge opened in 2011 across the Rio Negro. The Ponta Negra suburb has modern high-rises, buzzing restaurants and beaches that rival those of any town on the sea. But within minutes, visitors can find themselves in the watery jungle, the source of the Amazonian specialties like pirarucu fish and acai berries on the menus of Manaus’s restaurants.
  • Day 13 - Parintins Steeped in tradition, Parintins celebrates its centuries-old Indian culture each June at the Boi-Bumba Festival, a lavish event that rivals Rio's Carnivale, re-enacted for visitors at a local club. Sample shore excursions: Parintins by Tricycle; Boi-Bumba Festival Show.
  • Day 14 - Santarem A lively trading center on the Amazon (Henry Ford invested millions in rubber here in the 1920s). Here, see rubber and Brazil nut trees; learn how the locals make tapioca, staple of the Amazon; swim in the clear blue waters of the Rio Tapajos. Sample shore excursion: City Tour of Santarém; Tapajos National Forest.
  • Day 15 - Crossing the Equator
  • Day 15 - Amazon River Cruising
  • Day 15 - Crossing the Amazon River Bar, Brazil
  • Day 16 - At Sea
  • Day 17 - At Sea
  • Day 18 - Saint George What qualifies an entire town for UNESCO World Heritage Site status? For St. George’s (est.1612) it was both British charm - stone buildings, neatly bricked streets, heraldic signs – and the British Army and Royal Navy military installations that protected it through the centuries. Among the town's many historic strongholds is Fort Catherine, housing breathtaking replicas of Britain's Crown Jewels.
  • Day 19 - At Sea
  • Day 19 - At Sea
  • Day 20 - Oranjestad Located off the coasts of Venezuela and Colombia, the windswept Dutch island of Aruba feels like another world. When you take a cruise to Aruba, you can relax in the shade of a swaying Divi Divi tree on a pristine beach or explore untamed coastal cliffs in an exotic landscape filled with cacti. Just one day on an Aruba cruise can lead to a lifetime full of stories.
  • Day 21 - At Sea
  • Day 22 - Enter Panama Canal at Cristobal
  • Day 22 - Cruising Panama Canal
  • Day 22 - Exit Panama Canal Balboa
  • Day 23 - At Sea
  • Day 24 - Quepos On a tropical inlet at the edge of a rainforest, Quepos is one of the best places in the world for sport fishing, and gateway to the amazingly diverse flora and fauna of Manuel Antonio National Park.
  • Day 25 - At Sea
  • Day 26 - At Sea
  • Day 27 - At Sea
  • Day 28 - Puerto Vallarta Unique compared to Acapulco, Cancún, Zihuatanejo and several other coastal resort towns in Mexico—many of which were created by the government as planned communities—Puerto Vallarta ("PV" to locals), on the Pacific Ocean, retains quite a bit of its colonial-era charm. Its town square, Plaza de Armas, and the gorgeous parish church of Our Lady of Guadalupe, topped with an ornate crown and overlooking the port, serve as the loveliest representations of bygone ages. While on your Puerto Vallarta cruise, we take you alongside these echoes of the past are more modern attractions, including an ambitious public art project along the seaside walkway (the malecón) and trendy restaurants such as La Leche, serving contemporary Mexican cuisine. Round these out with plenty of fun-in-the-sun outdoor activities on and along Banderas Bay (whale-watching! snorkeling! jet-skiing!), excursions that reveal the best of Puerto Vallarta's flora and fauna, and a side trip to one of Mexico's pueblos mágicos (magical towns, a designation conferred by the government to recognize smaller towns that possess historical and cultural value), and you'd be hard-pressed to find a more pleasant place to spend part of your cruise to Puerto Vallarta.
  • Day 29 - At Sea
  • Day 29 - At Sea
  • Day 30 - At Sea
  • Day 30 - At Sea
  • Day 31 - At Sea
  • Day 32 - At Sea
  • Day 33 - At Sea
  • Day 34 - At Sea
  • Day 35 - Hilo Water and fire reign here: This is a land of verdant rain forests bisected by sparkling falls. But the fiery element flares along the volcanic coast of Kohala and the roaring furnace of the Kilauea volcano: Lava has continued to seep from the crater since its last eruption in 1983. Nature is Hilo's blessing, as well as its challenge. The beautiful crescent bay served as a funnel to two major tsunamis that battered the city—tragedies that are never forgotten and hopefully never repeated. (Hilo's Pacific Tsunami Museum remains a leader in safety education.) Once a busy fishing and farming area, Hilo blossomed into a commercial center for the sugarcane industry in the 1800s. Today’s town—its waterfront rebuilt since the last destructive wall of water in 1960—flourishes as a hub of galleries, independent shops, farmers markets and homegrown destination restaurants. A world-class astronomy center has joined this mix, underlining the awe unfolding through the telescopes atop Mauna Kea (the world's tallest peak from base to summit, outstripping Everest by 1,363 meters, or 4,472 feet!). Meanwhile, leafy Banyan Drive celebrates more earthbound stars with its arboreal Walk of Fame. Look up, look down: Wherever you glance, Hilo looks good.
  • Day 36 - Lahaina Glamorous resorts, stunning beaches, world-class golf courses, historic Lahaina Town: This enchanting island has it all, plus a magnificent volcano and the annual migration of the humpback whales. Sample shore excursions: Haleakala Crater & Iao Valley; Adventure to Hana; Lana'i Wild Dolphin & Snorkel Adventure.
  • Day 37 - Honololu, Hawaii Honolulu, on the island of Oahu’s south shore, is capital of Hawaii and gateway to the U.S. island chain. The Waikiki neighborhood is its center for dining, nightlife and shopping, famed for its iconic crescent beach backed by palms and high-rise hotels, with volcanic Diamond Head crater looming in the distance. Sites relating to the World War II attack on Pearl Harbor include the USS Arizona Memorial.
  • Day 38 - At Sea
  • Day 39 - At Sea
  • Day 40 - At Sea
  • Day 41 - Crossing the International Date line
  • Day 42 - Majuro Majuro is the capital and largest city of the Marshall Islands. It is also a large coral atoll of 64 islands in the Pacific Ocean. It forms a legislative district of the Ratak Chain of the Marshall Islands. The atoll has a land area of 9.7 square kilometres and encloses a lagoon of 295 square kilometres.
  • Day 43 - Majuro Majuro is the capital and largest city of the Marshall Islands. It is also a large coral atoll of 64 islands in the Pacific Ocean. It forms a legislative district of the Ratak Chain of the Marshall Islands. The atoll has a land area of 9.7 square kilometres and encloses a lagoon of 295 square kilometres.
  • Day 44 - At Sea
  • Day 45 - Chuuk Sand spits and coconut palms hold sway in the outer barrier islands, but Chuuk’s glory lies in its vast, shallow lagoon. This 64-kilometer-wide (40-mile-wide) sanctuary attracted the Imperial Japanese Navy, which based its fleet here during part of World War II . . . until the U.S. attacked (with a ferocity and destructive power often compared to Pearl Harbor). The battle littered the seafloor with wreckage: an evocative and haunting spectacle that now attracts divers from around the world. But Micronesia’s easternmost state has much to offer beyond this kaleidoscopic underwater world. It consists of 10 atolls, 19 high volcanic islands and 225 low-lying coralline islets. Fringed by mangroves, the bigger landmasses contain lush tangles of trees including mango, banana, coconut and breadfruit. Many locals still live close to the land: fishing, subsistence gardening and hunting for octopus with flashlights on the reefs at night. Visitors should be prepared to slip into these easy rhythms; Chuuk is wonderful, but not a bright-lights-big-city sort of place.
  • Day 46 - At Sea
  • Day 47 - At Sea
  • Day 48 - Guam Visit Guam on a Holland America Line cruise and experience the island “where America’s day begins.” Guam played an important role in WWII, one you can revisit while touring the War in the Pacific National Park and Asan Beach, where Americans reclaimed the island. Venture further into the past at Latte Stone Park, where you’ll find 2nd-century latte stone pillars, the foundations of elevated homes constructed by the Chamorro people. And explore historic Plaza de España, once the seat of colonial administrations, during your Guam adventure.
  • Day 49 - Saipan, Marianas Islands Saipan is the largest and most populous island in the Mariana Islands archipelago—a tropical paradise of 14 islands strung across the western Pacific. In addition to picture-postcard beaches and pristine waters, the island boasts a wealth of culture and history as well as outdoor activities that range from world-class diving to golf. Saipan has one of the most consistent temperatures in the world according to the Guinness World Records and its average year-round temperature of 29 degrees Celsius (84 degrees Fahrenheit) makes the island ideal for swimmers, snorkelers and beach lovers, who will want to explore the western coast of the island. The eastern shore is the place for strolls and hikes along the scenic rocky cliffs, and the interior sports lots of attractive limestone forests and Mount Tapochau, Saipan’s highest peak at 474 meters (1,554 feet). Garapan, the island’s main town, offers plenty of restaurants, bars and shopping centers and spring visitors might want to time their journey to coincide with the annual Flame Tree Festival, which brings together artists and dancers from all over Micronesia.
  • Day 50 - At Sea
  • Day 51 - At Sea
  • Day 52 - Ishigaki Island, Japan Talk with the Japanese a while about the Japanese and you’re going to hear the word shimagunikonjo. The breakdown is simple: shima—island; guni—nation; konjo—consciousness. In one word, it's the firm belief that people who live on islands are different from people who live on continents, and anyone who’s done both is likely to agree. American culture may be the strongest influence in Japan now, but the Japanese will understand the motivations of the Brits a whole lot better. Islands require a different mind-set than continents. Islands require manners. But what if your island was never meant to be part of another bunch of islands? That’s what’s happened with today’s Okinawa Prefecture. The people who’ve always been there are Okinawan, one of the healthiest, longest-living people on earth. But now they’re part of Japan and seriously outnumbered by the Japanese. (And they’re not at all happy that the Japanese interlopers gave so much of their land over to U.S. military bases.) Signs of Okinawan culture can be subtle but are easier to pick out in more remote islands of the chain, like Ishigaki. Traditional buildings are a mixture of Chinese and Japanese influences. In the markets, you’ll find fu chanpuru (an Okinawan stir fry dish) and whole-wheat soba, which the Japanese won't touch. The ryuso robe holds on despite crowded kimono stores. The few people left who speak Uchinaguchi are praying for a movement like the Hawaiian renaissance to bring the culture back. The tipping point is close. A trip to Ishigaki now is to witness either the beginning or the end.
  • Day 53 - Ishigaki Island, Japan Talk with the Japanese a while about the Japanese and you’re going to hear the word shimagunikonjo. The breakdown is simple: shima—island; guni—nation; konjo—consciousness. In one word, it's the firm belief that people who live on islands are different from people who live on continents, and anyone who’s done both is likely to agree. American culture may be the strongest influence in Japan now, but the Japanese will understand the motivations of the Brits a whole lot better. Islands require a different mind-set than continents. Islands require manners. But what if your island was never meant to be part of another bunch of islands? That’s what’s happened with today’s Okinawa Prefecture. The people who’ve always been there are Okinawan, one of the healthiest, longest-living people on earth. But now they’re part of Japan and seriously outnumbered by the Japanese. (And they’re not at all happy that the Japanese interlopers gave so much of their land over to U.S. military bases.) Signs of Okinawan culture can be subtle but are easier to pick out in more remote islands of the chain, like Ishigaki. Traditional buildings are a mixture of Chinese and Japanese influences. In the markets, you’ll find fu chanpuru (an Okinawan stir fry dish) and whole-wheat soba, which the Japanese won't touch. The ryuso robe holds on despite crowded kimono stores. The few people left who speak Uchinaguchi are praying for a movement like the Hawaiian renaissance to bring the culture back. The tipping point is close. A trip to Ishigaki now is to witness either the beginning or the end.
  • Day 54 - At Sea
  • Day 55 - At Sea
  • Day 56 - Tokyo Tokyo is the largest city on earth and packed with some of the world’s best shops, museums and restaurants, big and small. While the bright neon lights and the bustle of contemporary Tokyo may be what comes to mind when you think of the city, there is another side. Tokyo's historic gardens and neighborhoods of traditional homes on narrow lanes speak to a timeless Japan that has survived into the 21st century.
  • Day 57 - Tokyo Tokyo is the largest city on earth and packed with some of the world’s best shops, museums and restaurants, big and small. While the bright neon lights and the bustle of contemporary Tokyo may be what comes to mind when you think of the city, there is another side. Tokyo's historic gardens and neighborhoods of traditional homes on narrow lanes speak to a timeless Japan that has survived into the 21st century.
  • Day 58 - At Sea
  • Day 59 - Kobe This cosmopolitan port city is known for more than just its world-famous Kobe beef. Discover the boutiques and markets of the Motomashi and Kokashita districts, explore the Fashion Museum or venture out to the Akashi Kaikyo Bridge-the longest suspension bridge in the world. In the Kitano district, tour stately injikan, western-style Victorian and Gothic homes, or enjoy a glass of sake from one of Kobe's famed wineries.
  • Day 60 - Kobe This cosmopolitan port city is known for more than just its world-famous Kobe beef. Discover the boutiques and markets of the Motomashi and Kokashita districts, explore the Fashion Museum or venture out to the Akashi Kaikyo Bridge-the longest suspension bridge in the world. In the Kitano district, tour stately injikan, western-style Victorian and Gothic homes, or enjoy a glass of sake from one of Kobe's famed wineries.
  • Day 61 - Scenic Cruising
  • Day 62 - Fukuoka (Hakata), Japan
  • Day 63 - At Sea
  • Day 64 - Dalian The Dalian you see today, an important Asian trading port on China’s northeast coast, not far from North Korea, grew from a small fishing village and was shaped enormously by three powers that ruled the city over the course of the 20th century: Russia from 1898 to 1905, Japan from 1905 until the end of World War II and, after the city was liberated by Soviet troops, China. At first glance, Dalian looks like many other Chinese cities—sprawling and industrialized. But look a bit closer and you’ll notice its pleasant seaside promenades, lush green spaces like Labor Park (particularly lovely during cherry-blossom season) and grand historic buildings, including those on Russian Street and the Art Nouveau Yamato Hotel. Beyond its historic and cultural sites, Dalian’s seaside location makes it one of the best places in China to enjoy fresh seafood. When you are ready for a break from exploring the city, head to one of Dalian’s many restaurants and you’ll see families, couples hand in hand and groups of friends tucking into seafood feasts and sipping Tsingtao beer, a legacy of German rule in Qingdao, some 400 kilometers (250 miles) to the south.
  • Day 65 - Tianjin (Beijing), China When it comes to culture and history, few cities compete with China’s capital, Beijing, roughly two hours north of the port of Tianjin. Its Forbidden City is unparalleled: This massive former imperial complex is home to the Palace Museum and its collection of nearly 1 million Chinese antiquities. At the Summer Palace, you can stroll the same covered walkways that emperors and their courts did. The Temple of Heaven is a handsome Taoist place of worship surrounded by a large public park where you will see locals making offerings, practicing tai chi and flying kites. And, of course, there is the Great Wall, at a staggering length of 21,000 kilometers (13,000 miles) a true wonder of the world. Though Tianjin often plays second fiddle to Beijing, this city has a number of important cultural sights of its own. At the Confucius Temple, learn about the great philosopher's teachings and do as the locals do by writing prayers or wishes on small plaques. You can learn about the city’s history at the excellent Tianjin Museum and at the Shi Family Mansion, the stately former home of one of Tianjin’s leading families.
  • Day 66 - Xingang (Beijing) Xingang links you to Beijing, where the power of 24 successive emperors radiates from the Forbidden City. Your Holland America ship will be here for two full days, allowing ample time to shop, explore and feast on Peking Duck right here in Peking! Sample shore excursions: Beijing & the Forbidden City; Ming Tombs & the Great Wall of China; Tianjin City Tour.
  • Day 67 - At Sea
  • Day 68 - At Sea
  • Day 69 - Shanghai Shanghai is one of Asia’s most dynamic cities, and one of juxtapositions. It’s divided in two by the Huangpu River—to the west is Puxi and to the east Pudong. Puxi is the city’s downtown and its historic center; on this side of the river, much of the city was historically divided into the famous foreign concessions, and it’s here that much of the shopping, dining and nightlife is concentrated today. Shanghai has more than 30,000 restaurants, from humble soup dumpling spots to formal affairs helmed by Michelin-starred chefs. Its museums, particularly the Shanghai Museum with its 120,000-strong collection of antiquities, are equally impressive. Pudong is where the city’s major skyscrapers stand, among them the Jin Mao and Oriental Pearl towers. Nowhere is Shanghai’s rich history and bright future more evident than along the Huangpu River. Stand on the Puxi side and, with the Bund—along which curve Shanghai’s stately early-20th-century heritage buildings—behind you, you can gaze across the river at some of the world’s tallest buildings, soaring skyscrapers that glow nightly, their lights reflected in the river.
  • Day 70 - Shanghai Shanghai is one of Asia’s most dynamic cities, and one of juxtapositions. It’s divided in two by the Huangpu River—to the west is Puxi and to the east Pudong. Puxi is the city’s downtown and its historic center; on this side of the river, much of the city was historically divided into the famous foreign concessions, and it’s here that much of the shopping, dining and nightlife is concentrated today. Shanghai has more than 30,000 restaurants, from humble soup dumpling spots to formal affairs helmed by Michelin-starred chefs. Its museums, particularly the Shanghai Museum with its 120,000-strong collection of antiquities, are equally impressive. Pudong is where the city’s major skyscrapers stand, among them the Jin Mao and Oriental Pearl towers. Nowhere is Shanghai’s rich history and bright future more evident than along the Huangpu River. Stand on the Puxi side and, with the Bund—along which curve Shanghai’s stately early-20th-century heritage buildings—behind you, you can gaze across the river at some of the world’s tallest buildings, soaring skyscrapers that glow nightly, their lights reflected in the river.
  • Day 71 - At Sea
  • Day 72 - At Sea
  • Day 73 - Hong Kong Can any city in the world top Hong Kong's phenomenal energy? Judge for yourself as you ride the tram to the top of Victoria Peak, join the surge into countless markets and watch the hardworking world of Aberdeen's fishing junks. Sample shore excursions: Morning Tai Chi & Cooking Tour; Hong Kong Island City Sightseeing; Explore Lantau Island & Monastery.
  • Day 74 - Hong Kong Can any city in the world top Hong Kong's phenomenal energy? Judge for yourself as you ride the tram to the top of Victoria Peak, join the surge into countless markets and watch the hardworking world of Aberdeen's fishing junks. Sample shore excursions: Morning Tai Chi & Cooking Tour; Hong Kong Island City Sightseeing; Explore Lantau Island & Monastery.
  • Day 75 - At Sea
  • Day 76 - Da Nang Located halfway between Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, the port city of Da Nang has a small-town charm despite its lack of big-ticket attractions. It is home to a stunning 30-kilometer (18-mile) coastline that is popular for water sports such as waterskiing, paddleboarding and surfing. It’s also known for its great street food—and an extremely quirky bridge that you can't miss. The place was previously occupied by both the French and the Americans (this was the first place U.S. Marines landed in March 1965), and vestiges of both can be seen in the city, from the remnants of the vast U.S. air base and hospital to the city’s wide boulevards and old villas. Da Nang is a great launchpad for day trips, whether to the picturesque city of Hoi An to the south, the old imperial capital of Hue to the north, or the majestic Marble Mountains to the southwest. The UNESCO-protected Champa temple complex, My Son, which lies 69 kilometers (43 miles) southeast, is definitely worth the trip—but for those who don’t want to leave the urban environs, many of the ruins have ended up at Da Nang's excellent Museum of Cham Sculpture, where you can learn all about the history and architecture of this fascinating culture.
  • Day 77 - At Sea
  • Day 78 - Phu My Whether you are on a wide boulevard admiring the French Colonial architectural influence, or in a bustling market haggling with a street vendor, you cannot escape the culture and history of this bustling city. Ho Chi Minh City is home to many colorful pagodas, cathedrals and palaces-including one of the city's oldest, Giac Lam Pagoda, dating from 1744. Sample shore excursions: Cambodia & Angkor Overland Adventure or Highlights of Ho Chi Minh City.
  • Day 79 - At Sea
  • Day 80 - At Sea
  • Day 81 - Singapore City-states are rare in the present day—and none are quite like Singapore. In the 20th century, the Southeast Asian nation hurtled itself into the modern world, and it continues to expand its state-of-the-art transportation system and build its edgy skyline. Yet Singapore's urban plan wisely maintained its intimate neighborhoods, many with streets lined with colorful shophouses (a type of building unique to parts of Asia, with businesses located on their ground floors and residences above). Add the city’s mix of ethnic groups—mainly Malays, Chinese and Indians—and you get a vibrant cultural scene that attracts a cosmopolitan, international community. Singapore's food scene—which is arguably the world's most dynamic and runs the gamut from beloved street hawkers to Michelin-starred venues—would merit a trip alone, as would its never-ending shopping options. But the city is also packed with world-class museums, many designed by celebrated architects, and it hosts many major international events, such as the Formula One Grand Prix. Yet only about half of the 720-square-kilometer (278-square-mile) island is developed, which leaves plenty of room for parks and open spaces such as the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, where an old-growth forest still thrives.
  • Day 82 - At Sea
  • Day 83 - At Sea
  • Day 84 - At Sea
  • Day 85 - Colombo Scarred by decades of civil war, Sri Lanka and its commercial capital, Colombo, are relatively new to modern-day tourism. But Colombo has been a crucial trading post for more than 2,000 years. The city rose to prominence as Sri Lanka's most important port town in the 16th century with the arrival of Portuguese fleets. After a period under Dutch rule, Ceylon—as Sri Lanka was then called—became part of the British Empire in 1802. Sri Lanka gained independence in 1948, but the country experienced intense unrest from 1983 until 2009, when Sri Lanka's civil war finally came to an end. Many visitors head for the pristine beaches or up to the mist-draped mountains of Sri Lanka's tea country, and find that Colombo merits more than just a quick stop. Development continues at breakneck speed here, with skyscrapers jostling for space alongside the elegant architecture of its colonial past. Bustling markets and newfangled shops rub shoulders with ancient temples and rich layers of history in this fascinating place.
  • Day 86 - At Sea
  • Day 87 - At Sea
  • Day 88 - Mumbai (Bombay) The ever-growing megacity of Mumbai (formerly Bombay) juts out into the Arabian Sea, seemingly emerging like magic from the water. Mostly built on reclaimed land, the metropolis boasts more than 21 million people crammed into its maze of streets, giving rise to the chaotic roads, bumper-to-bumper traffic and overflowing slums that it's famous, or infamous, for. But the city also has Bollywood bling along with multimillion-dollar homes and hotels. There’s a national park smack-dab in Mumbai, and exquisite restaurants and hipster bars. It’s both India’s financial heart and the home of astounding colonial-era architecture. It’s diverse, vibrant and multicultural—packed with people and filled with a contagious energy. With so much going on, there’s something for everyone. Dive into the action at one of the many outdoor bazaars; wander the famous streets of South Mumbai; be wowed by ancient rock art at Elephanta Island; or learn about more-recent history at the Gandhi Museum. Then, end your day watching the sun sink into the Arabian Sea over dinner and drinks.
  • Day 89 - Mumbai (Bombay) The ever-growing megacity of Mumbai (formerly Bombay) juts out into the Arabian Sea, seemingly emerging like magic from the water. Mostly built on reclaimed land, the metropolis boasts more than 21 million people crammed into its maze of streets, giving rise to the chaotic roads, bumper-to-bumper traffic and overflowing slums that it's famous, or infamous, for. But the city also has Bollywood bling along with multimillion-dollar homes and hotels. There’s a national park smack-dab in Mumbai, and exquisite restaurants and hipster bars. It’s both India’s financial heart and the home of astounding colonial-era architecture. It’s diverse, vibrant and multicultural—packed with people and filled with a contagious energy. With so much going on, there’s something for everyone. Dive into the action at one of the many outdoor bazaars; wander the famous streets of South Mumbai; be wowed by ancient rock art at Elephanta Island; or learn about more-recent history at the Gandhi Museum. Then, end your day watching the sun sink into the Arabian Sea over dinner and drinks.
  • Day 90 - At Sea
  • Day 91 - At Sea
  • Day 92 - Fujairah Port description coming soon.Located on the Gulf of Oman, Fujairah has been a site of human habitation and trade for more than 4,000 years. In this ancient place, you’ll find Al Badiyah, the Emirates’ oldest mosque still in use.
  • Day 93 - Fujairah Port description coming soon.Located on the Gulf of Oman, Fujairah has been a site of human habitation and trade for more than 4,000 years. In this ancient place, you’ll find Al Badiyah, the Emirates’ oldest mosque still in use.
  • Day 94 - Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi, one of the emirates of the United Arab Emirates, is an archipelago of islands along the edge of the Arabian Gulf. That is why, surprisingly for a desert city, you'll find water attractions everywhere in Abu Dhabi: Mangrove marshes border its eastern shore, and there are flat, sandy beaches at every turn. All that water means water sports galore on your itinerary of things to do, all within a few minutes by car from downtown's sightseeing. But you can also drive about 90 minutes out of Abu Dhabi and find the stunning vistas and orange-hued dunes of the Rub' al-Khali (the Empty Quarter), the largest contiguous sand desert in the world. In between your beachy morning and dune-trek afternoon, you can shop for couture in a gleaming mall, eat a delicious shawarma sandwich made in a tiny storefront, or visit the inspiring Grand Mosque, the final resting place of the founder of the United Arab Emirates. This capital city glistens with wealth: You’ll see Maseratis idling next to you at the traffic lights. Abu Dhabi is investing in culture and tourist attractions, too, with branches of the Louvre and the Guggenheim currently under construction. A day in Abu Dhabi will give you a taste of the life in the Gulf and its sights, in all its beauty and complexity.
  • Day 95 - At Sea
  • Day 96 - Muscat The capital and largest city of the Sultanate of Oman, Muscat is a beautiful Middle Eastern city offering visitors diverse attractions. Explore Bahla Fort, a UNESCO World Heritage Site built in the 13th and 14th centuries; visit the spectacular Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque; and enjoy a stroll through Qurum National Park. Muscat also offers several museums and, further afield, the unique opportunity to watch camel racing and bull fights. Sample shore excursion: Cruise on an Arabian Dhow; Culture of Muscat.
  • Day 97 - At Sea
  • Day 98 - Salalah Tucked between the Dhofar Mountains and the Arabian Sea, subtropical Salalah is the gateway to Southern Oman’s pristine white-sand beaches, dramatic natural beauty and ancient frankincense-trade routes. Each year from July to September, the rains of the khareef, a monsoon that blows in from the Indian Ocean, transform the Dhofar region’s stark desert vistas into lush oases dotted with seasonal waterfalls and grazing camels. Enjoy a scenic drive through these misty-green peaks and wadis, worlds away from the bone-dry Omani heartland to the north. Spend an afternoon strolling under coconut palms and frankincense trees on one of Salālah’s hidden beaches. Follow in the footsteps of famed travelers like Ibn Battutah, Marco Polo and the Queen of Sheba at the region’s four \"Land of Frankincense\" UNESCO World Heritage Sites. These waterfront archaeological parks bear witness to a rich history of traffic in incense and spices dating back to the Neolithic period. Merchants from all over the world once swarmed Salālah’s ports and markets. Today, the city retains its identity as a crossroads for cultures, climates and landscapes. A journey through Salalah’s tropical-fruit plantations and bustling souks will transport you from the Arabian Desert to Zanzibar, India and beyond.
  • Day 99 - At Sea
  • Day 100 - At Sea
  • Day 101 - At Sea
  • Day 102 - At Sea
  • Day 103 - Aqaba (for Petra) Jordan may appear at first glance like a vast, empty land, but its territory has been inhabited for 6,000 years and it is home to an enormous number of historic sites and natural wonders. Most of them are easily accessible just off of the King’s Highway, which stretches from the capital, Amman, down to Aqaba on the Red Sea. As the country’s only port, Aqaba has long been linked to the legend of Lawrence of Arabia, or T.E. Lawrence, and to the famous 1962 film by Sir David Lean. The massive Aqaba flagpole is, at 131 meters (430 feet), one of the tallest in the world and commemorates the Great Arab Revolt of 1916 against the Ottoman Empire in which Lawrence played a key role. Aqaba is a decidedly quieter place now than in the heyday of revolt, whether one comes for the deepwater dive spots, duty-free shopping or its new high-end residential and resort district. Old Aqaba, with a fort that dates from the era of Christian crusaders, continues to be a wonderfully atmospheric neighborhood. There, after a long day in the desert heat, visitors can seek out a Turkish bath for a massage and scrub or take a break from exploring at any number of cafés that overlook the port.
  • Day 104 - Aqaba (for Petra) Jordan may appear at first glance like a vast, empty land, but its territory has been inhabited for 6,000 years and it is home to an enormous number of historic sites and natural wonders. Most of them are easily accessible just off of the King’s Highway, which stretches from the capital, Amman, down to Aqaba on the Red Sea. As the country’s only port, Aqaba has long been linked to the legend of Lawrence of Arabia, or T.E. Lawrence, and to the famous 1962 film by Sir David Lean. The massive Aqaba flagpole is, at 131 meters (430 feet), one of the tallest in the world and commemorates the Great Arab Revolt of 1916 against the Ottoman Empire in which Lawrence played a key role. Aqaba is a decidedly quieter place now than in the heyday of revolt, whether one comes for the deepwater dive spots, duty-free shopping or its new high-end residential and resort district. Old Aqaba, with a fort that dates from the era of Christian crusaders, continues to be a wonderfully atmospheric neighborhood. There, after a long day in the desert heat, visitors can seek out a Turkish bath for a massage and scrub or take a break from exploring at any number of cafés that overlook the port.
  • Day 105 - At Sea
  • Day 106 - At Sea
  • Day 107 - Ashdod (Jerusalem) Jerusalem is one of the world’s most fabled cities, with an extraordinary history. Travelers today can’t help but be struck by the overwhelming sense of antiquity and the powerful feeling of being in the midst of more than 26 centuries of civilization. At countless sites, the city’s layers are peeled away and exposed. The spiritual heart of Judaism, the Western Wall is the last remnant of the Temple of Jerusalem. For Christian travelers—or those interested in the early days of Christianity—visiting the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem and the Garden of Gethsemane are unforgettable experiences. For the third great monotheistic religion, Islam, Jerusalem is also a holy city. The Al Aqsa Mosque, the third most important holy site of that faith, is located on the Temple Mount, the holiest site of Judaism. Much of the magic of Jerusalem, however, is that it’s also a living vibrant city. As you make your way to its landmarks, you’ll pass through neighborhoods bustling with Israelis, Palestinians and travelers and pilgrims from every corner of the globe. William Faulkner’s famous phrase, “The past isn’t dead. It isn’t even past,” describes the experience of Jerusalem perfectly as it continues its role as a unique cultural crossroads to this day.
  • Day 107 - Transit Suez Canal
  • Day 107 - Exit Suez Canal at Port Said
  • Day 108 - Haifa (Tel Aviv), Israel From this port on the slopes of Mt. Carmel travel to Nazareth, home of the young Jesus. And visit the land of miracles--Galilee, the Jordan River, the Mount of the Beautitudes and Tabgha.
  • Day 109 - At Sea
  • Day 110 - Kusadasi (Ephesus), Turkey Kusadasi in Turkey is the gateway to one of the most legendary cities of the ancient world: Ephesus. St. Paul preached in its Great Theater, while the facade of the Celsus Library survives as a testament to the city’s role as a center of learning and culture. Not far from Ephesus, the Temple of Artemis (also known as the Temple of Diana), one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, once stood, drawing pilgrims from around the Mediterranean. While it no longer stands, it is possible to walk amongst its foundations and the remains of its towering columns. Other historic sites can also be found nearby: The House of Mary is believed to be the home of Jesus’s mother at the end of her life, and the Basilica of St. John, constructed in the 6th century, marks the location of his tomb. (Like Mary, he spent his final years in Ephesus.) Nearby, the Selcuk fortress reflects the period of Byzantine and Ottoman control of the region. From ancient wonders to holy sites, there are few ports in the Mediterranean as magical as Kusadasi, and a day here is a day spent in the company of some of antiquity's greatest figures.
  • Day 111 - At Sea
  • Day 112 - Istanbul Blurring the line between east and west, Istanbul stands at the crossroads of two continents. The city's architecture is rivalled only by its spectacular natural setting on the Bosphorus Strait. See the Blue Mosque, the Topkapi Palace and the Byzantine Church of St Sophia. Take time to wander through the Grand Bazaar or the Spice Market and sample baklava and shish kebabs.
  • Day 112 - Istanbul Blurring the line between east and west, Istanbul stands at the crossroads of two continents. The city's architecture is rivalled only by its spectacular natural setting on the Bosphorus Strait. See the Blue Mosque, the Topkapi Palace and the Byzantine Church of St Sophia. Take time to wander through the Grand Bazaar or the Spice Market and sample baklava and shish kebabs.
  • Day 113 - Mykonos Informality rules on this sunny isle where pleasure-seekers from around the world come to play. Ramble along narrow streets past white-washed houses and blue-domed churches, bouganvillea-covered walls and thread-like, step-laden footpaths leading everywhere.
  • Day 114 - Piraeus (Athens), Greece No modern metropolis is more steeped in myth than Athens, Greece. From the gritty port of Piraeus—gateway to Greece’s fabled isles—to the Parthenon—eternal symbol of Western civilization—Athens has attracted adventurers and classicists for centuries. This heritage is still very much alive for modern visitors sightseeing in Athens: ancient stadiums and temples dwell alongside apartment blocks, modern performances are staged in the marble amphitheaters where Greek drama was born and millennia-old monuments are scattered in the archaeological park that circles the Acropolis. One of the world’s oldest maritime powers, Athens is blessed with a balmy climate and stunning coastline. The seaside suburbs of Athens are scalloped with sandy beaches, fancy yacht clubs and glamorous beach bars. While the Athenian lifestyle is known for late-night dinners and dancing until dawn, the city shines brightly by day in the bustling markets, lively cafés and fascinating museums that illuminate Greece's past and present. Contemplate the magnitude of all that culture and ancient tourist attractions while marveling at the sun setting into the Aegean or rising over the Acropolis.
  • Day 115 - At Sea
  • Day 116 - Naples (Pompeii) Rising behind the wide curve of its bay with brooding Mount Vesuvius and the deep blue sea as a backdrop, Naples, Italy enjoys a magnificent natural setting. It is the third-largest city in Italy after Rome and Milan, and arguably the most colorful and seductive of them all: Splendor and squalor live side by side in 21st-century Naples, and the mix is intoxicating. Cruise to Naples, home to world-class museums and attractions. Naples has something for everyone - superb restaurants, eclectic shopping, a thriving contemporary art scene and an edgy and vibrant street life. But once you’ve had enough of the pounding traffic and jostling crowds while sightseeing in Naples, there are endless opportunities for exploration further afield. The celebrated Roman ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum, both victims of Vesuvius’ devastating 79 C.E. eruption, lie just south of the city. Explore Naples' history or take a short ride over to the island of Capri on a Naples shore excursion. The delightful town of Sorrento and the magnificent scenery of the Amalfi Coast are also within easy reach, and the dolce vita glamour of Capri—not to mention the healing thermal waters of Ischia—are a short hydrofoil hop from the mainland. Naples cruises offer a perfect mix of cultural and natural attractions.
  • Day 117 - At Sea
  • Day 118 - At Sea
  • Day 119 - Malaga Málaga is your chance to tour to the Moorish wonders of the Alhambra with its elaborate carvings, grand columns and delicate arches. Stalagmites and stalactites reach calcite fingers into the caverns of Nerja, near Malaga. 30,000 years ago, people lived in the shadowy recesses of these caves. In nearby Mijas, shop tables are laden with hand-made ceramics, and the people live in shuttered, whitewashed cottages.
  • Day 120 - At Sea
  • Day 121 - At Sea
  • Day 122 - Ponta Delgada You'll be astonished to see, in the depths of the huge crater at the center of the island, two lakes--one emerald green, the other sky-blue. Your guide will explain. More astonishments: a cluster of hot springs bubbling in the mist.
  • Day 123 - At Sea
  • Day 124 - At Sea
  • Day 125 - At Sea
  • Day 126 - At Sea
  • Day 127 - At Sea
  • Day 128 - At Sea
  • Day 129 - Fort Lauderdale There is an abundance of things to see and do in the Ft. Lauderdale area: visit the newly redesigned Ft. Lauderdale Beach and cafes, stroll the historic Riverwalk, shop the luxurious stores on Las Olas Boulevard or adventure to the Everglades for an intriguing air boat excursion.
  • Day 130 - Fort Lauderdale There is an abundance of things to see and do in the Ft. Lauderdale area: visit the newly redesigned Ft. Lauderdale Beach and cafes, stroll the historic Riverwalk, shop the luxurious stores on Las Olas Boulevard or adventure to the Everglades for an intriguing air boat excursion.
** Itinerary may vary by sailing date.

Onboard experience

Designed to carry fewer guests while offering greater space, Zaandam is elegant and comfortable. Her décor is inspired by music and features musical instruments including signed guitars from Queen, Iggy Pop, Eric Clapton and the Rolling Stones and a Baroque-style pipe organ. While on-board, enjoy cooking shows and hands-on workshops with America’s Test Kitchen. Rejuvenate at the Greenhouse Spa & Salon. Indulge at any of our fine dining venues.

Facilities

Recreational: Card Room, Outdoor Pool, Club HAL, Indoor Pool, The Loft and The Oasis, Golf Simulator
Fitness: Tennis Court, Gym, Aerobics, Volleyball, Basketball, Fitness Center
Other: Reception, Art Gallery, Shops, Photo Gallery, On Board Doctor, Laundry Service, Shore Excursion Office, Photo Shop, Duty-free shop, Atrium, Culinary Arts Center, Future Cruise Sales
Food and Drink: Pinnacle Grill, Lido Bar, The Verandah, Queens Room, Explorations Cafe, The Atrium, Piano Bar, Lido Casual Restaurant, Rotterdam Dining Room, Canaletto Restaurant
Relaxation: Steam Room, Sauna, Whirlpool, Beauty Salon, Massage, Spa, Greenhouse Spa & Salon, Thermal Suite, Lido Pool
Entertainment: Neptune Lounge, Crow's Nest, Dance Floor, Photo Gallery, Explorers Lounge, Theatre, Mondriaan Show Lounge

Deck layout

Dolphin
Lido Deck
Lower Promenade
Main Deck
Navigation Deck
Promenade
Sky Deck
Sports Deck
Upper Promenade
Verandah Deck

Important Notice

The above information has been obtained from the relevant suppliers and should be considered an indicative guide only as to the prices that may be available for these products. Flight Centre cannot guarantee that any particular product will still be available at the following prices, or for your exact dates of travel. At the time of making your booking, prices may differ to that price displayed on this website. Please contact a Flight Centre travel consultant to obtain the latest up to date information regarding applicable prices, fees and charges, taxes, availability, any blackout dates (such as school holidays), seasonal surcharges and other terms and conditions which may apply.

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